Joh for PM, 1987. Sticker inserted in the Sun Herald 8 March 1987. Collection of the Fryer Library, University of Queensland.

Copyright © Collection of the Fryer Library, University of Queensland

Now, more than ever, Queensland needs Joh and the Nationals for Industrial Relations, 1986.Political advertisement for National Party, Brisbane 1986. Collection of the Fryer Library, University of Queensland.

Copyright © Collection of the Fryer Library, University of Queensland

The Petersen Line, 1974

QLD
Australia
1 January 1974
23 September 2010
23 September 2010

Location

QLD
Australia
Australian Labor Party

Copyright © Collection of the Fryer Library, University of Queensland

The Petersen Line, 1974. Sells out Queensland’s assets, keeps out national subsidies. Australian Labor Party campaign brochure against Joh Bjelke-Petersen. Collection of the Fryer Library, University of Queensland

Joh’s power: very costly, c1978. Anti Joh Bjelke-Petersen bumper sticker. Collection of the Fryer Library, University of Queensland

Copyright © Collection of the Fryer Library, University of Queensland

Bjelke Bitter Queensland’s premier beer for discriminating drinkers. Beer label, c1970s. Collection of the Fryer Library, University of Queensland.

Copyright © Collection of the Fryer Library, University of Queensland

Queensland during Joh Bjelke-Petersen’s premiership (1968-87) appeared to confirm political scientist S.M. Lipset’s claim that ‘every country has a South’.

Following a surprise win in the formerly safe Labor seat of Oxley at the March 1996 Federal election (where she attracted a nation-high swing to her of 19.3%), Pauline Hanson and her divisive views

The 27 May 1967 national Referendum was a turning point in Queensland’s political landscape, though not in the manner ordinarily conceived.

Queensland has always been known for its extremes.

Syndicate content